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  • "Darthen" started this thread

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Tuesday, June 25th 2019, 10:19pm

what happens when Flash dies in 2020 ?

Hi all, support for Flash is ending next year (2020), what happens to Flash-based games at that point? -- Darthen

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Tuesday, June 25th 2019, 11:02pm

Short answer: Game closes down.

Long answer: Many games remain as is, if you have a Flash emulator of some sort, you can still run them. There are projects ongoing that clone existing Flash games (Flashpoint is the major player in this scene if you want to do research).


But for games like KaL where a server connection is needed, even if you managed to pull the majority of the game using some sort of swf packet manipulation (cracking Flash games has been a scene since years back), you can't really get past the server when it comes to things like updates and whatnot. Asset rips have been done, but there's really no way to run KaL offline (unless you're willing to do the full legwork and simulate a server, but you need a lot more knowhow beyond simple swf packet manipulation for that).
Basically, if the devs decide to shut down the server, it's game over. I guess for some folks that's the worst case scenario.


Scale that back. Let's say that the devs continue to run Flash past the deadline. They can continue running it technically, it just won't recieve updates and it'll be recognized as a dangerous application by the browsers that continue to retain Flash "support". Because Flash won't get anymore security updates, basically more vulnerabilities will show up over time. The browsers that cut off support entirely for Flash like Chrome, Firefox, etc. will just refuse the swf when it attempts to run. If they do a full pull (which they should for software optimization, because Flash becomes obsolete), then it just won't recognize that there's a swf at all.

If the devs want to continue running the game, they either migrate the entire client over to another language like HTML5 or they do the above, but tell all of their users to find a browser that is still willing to support Flash for whatever bizarre reason.

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  • "Darthen" started this thread

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Wednesday, June 26th 2019, 4:46pm

Years ago when Magestorm went offline (real time run around sim-3d arena throwing spells at each other), an emulator survived but could only do practice mode against terrible AI. I think it might actually still be around.

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Wednesday, June 26th 2019, 9:49pm

Yes, Flash emulators exist (Flashpoint runs over several thousand games going by their list, but KaL isn't one of them), but the problem is that it requires people to either actively work out the contents of the swf to determine how much of a data pull is necessary, or for people to figure out how to spoof the swf connection. If the latter was easy to do (which would mean that the devs did a horrible job patching out one of the basic shortcomings of Flash), we'd see a lot more manual manipulation of accounts. It also isn't likely that the devs would willingly give up the code, because well....they might not even own the code themselves anymore...

The problem is that with KaL this form of emulation doesn't work properly, because KaL requires "update cycling" and judging by past updates, seems to be really dependent on manual updates. And I'm not saying this for just card/event purposes, but also for error checking purposes. We'll backtrack a little to when RoM died.



So, when RoM went down, people that were datamining RoM confirmed (we had one person that did it so that we could get an asset rip, that same person was also the one that provided most of the images for the RoM card wiki) that the fundamental base of RoM is the same as KaL, which is the same as the Chinese and Japanese servers. The difference really comes down to individual server end manipulation - but it resulted in a lot of card data that never got used, or settings that never got implemented (because the data was downloaded and the options were there, but choices were made to ignore them).

For instance, the Japanese server expanded their Tower Shop to include a bunch of weird cards that I think only the Chinese server had. Neither RoM nor KaL had this. There's actually a very clear distinction in the datamine of some cards being from the "Japanese" set, and the Japanese wiki for their version of KaL confirms the technical changes. The idea of "specific/theme packs" also originates from the Japanese server, though I think the Chinese server may have done it as well since it's a fairly common gacha technique anyways.

The Chinese server handles updates differently, but they're basically "leading" as far as updates go because they have the largest card pool and constantly add more to force the whales to move.

On a lesser scale, RoM modified their foundation data a little to include extra rewards for PvP weekly, changed up their League, and also their daily log in rewards.

So basically what this means is that even if you did theoretically clone KaL entirely and mimiced server behaviour, you'd still have an issue figuring out how to mimic the administrator side and implement patches to keep things running. Basically you'd have to program the game manually (and we know they do this a lot, because of all the manual typos that occur in cards, as well as the bugs that show up for individual cards on some servers but not others - basically problems that were fixed elsewhere aren't fixed in specific servers). There's also an issue when it comes to graphical overflow - if you tried to insert all of the extra dungeons in at the same time there are generally overflow errors that start chewing on memory. Some computers that don't handle flash well can already experience some of the errors just looking at the card gallery alone. On RoM, some of their cards were exacerbate this problem.

Long story short, emulating KaL would be a nightmare and then some.

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  • "Darthen" started this thread

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Wednesday, June 26th 2019, 11:14pm

For sure --

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